All posts filed under: Training Design

2002 – 2016 Gamification RIP. PS. I’m back.

Hello all, Firstly, let me start by apologising for the lack of activity on the blog for some time. I’ve been very busy over Christmas and the New Year with clients and plenty of storyboards! I wanted to give you an update on what I’ve been up to and what’s to come from Gaming in Training in 2016. I’ve spoken at a number of events at the tail end of 2015 and most recently at LT2016 which was a great experience and the floor was packed, encouraging to see so many people interested and enthused by gamification. My seminar was based on ‘Thinking like a Game Designer’ and showed the differences between good design and sloppy gamification application. So what’s to come in 2016? Well this year I want to focus more attention on delivering quality video blogs to you. This was really well received last year when I analysed a game in real time to show what we can learn. Fortunately I should be receiving a new camera set up this week to make sure …

E-Learning Awards 2015 Results – E-Learning Designer of the Year

As many of you know from reading my post last month I was shortlisted for the E-Learning Designer of the Year award, I’m incredibly pleased and proud to tell you that I won the Silver award. Yes, I know it’s not gold, but it’s still a great achievement that I take a lot of pride in. Full congratulations go to Paul Welch @ City & Guilds Kineo for picking up the Gold, it sounds like a lot of great work went on there this year. Also congratulations to Robert Doyle @ KPMG who picked up the bronze award. Of course a lot of thanks goes to the team I work with at Kallidus because without them the courses would stay as creative ideas or ‘wild dreams’ as some people refer to them. The Kallidus team also picked up 4 other awards including a Gold award for Best use of blended learning in partnership with Interact for all their work with Transport for London. All in all a very successful night for everyone. For me the …

7 Ways Super Mario Maker Can Help Improve Your E-Learning

So I was going to pull out another video blog, but I’ve had some downtime this weekend where recording just wasn’t possible but writing was. I’ve been playing a lot of Super Mario Maker since its release on September 11th, not only has it been a brilliant game but it has provided me with a stupid amount of ideas for E-Learning. There’s a review I read of Super Mario Maker that said the following – “Making levels in Super Mario Maker – the Wii U’s powerful creative suite is easy. Making good levels, however, is much more difficult.” Nothing truer can be said about E-Learning. In this post I’d like to look at 7 things I’ve learnt from trying to create good levels in Super Mario Maker and how these points could improve your E-Learning. I’m actually going to list how to create good levels in Mario Maker and how the points crossover to E-Learning. This is in an attempt to show how my mind is working and how I make the links from video …

First Video Post – Remove Instructional Text from your E-Learning NOW! (Using King’s Quest as inspiration!)

Welcome to the first YouTube post here at Gaming in Training! I’ll let the video do the talking for me this week, but there is a bit of information about King’s Quest (the game I’m looking at this week!) What is King’s Quest? Unlike previous King’s Quest video game, the new King’s Quest would not be a point-and-click adventure. Instead, it is an adventure game that tasks players to control Graham, who ventures to different places to become a knight. The movement of Graham can be completely controlled by players.According to Matt Korba, the game’s creative director, the game’s controls focuses on “one-button context.” As a result, the game would not have any complicated interface or controls. Throughout the game, players can interact with different environmental objects. For instance, players can pick up, gather and inspect different scenery items. They can switch to first-person perspective when inspecting them. The game is narrated by the old Graham and his granddaughter Gwendolyn. Players’ action in the game changes narrative. For instances, Performing certain actions unlock additional dialogue. When player …

What’s in a UI? Team Fortress 2 and E-Learning!

You’ll find that this post is more of an introduction into looking at how UIs are designed within games, giving some background information and detail which will help with later posts on this topic. I will discuss some of the options we can take forward into E-Learning to get the best out of onscreen content. This article should be of particular benefit if you’re created adventure based or explorative E-Learning courses. Before reading further in this post there is some terminology you need to be familiar with – although not for any other purpose so that I can use it below it will help should you come across these terms again in our exploration of UIs. Diegetic: Interface that is included in the game world — i.e., it can be seen and heard by the game characters. An example of this is the would be holographic computer terminals in a game. Non-diegetic: Interface that is rendered outside the game world, only visible and audible to the players in the real world. Example: most classic heads-up display (HUD) elements. I’d like to …

Using the Zeigarnik effect in learning – how objectives can dramatically increase engagement!

In this post I want to discuss a term called the Zeigarnik effect. By the end of this post my aim is that you will have a new way to think about displaying objectives or goals in your courses and not just considering them standard introductory slide fodder. Objectives can play a large part in motivation and engagement throughout a course, but we have to ensure that they are used, crafted and portrayed effectively. As a small warning before we begin, this post is a little more academic than my usual posts but there is still a lot of value in its content. I’ve stripped back a lot of the dull academia, so whilst there are still references for the writers, the language should still be in an enjoyable and relatable style. The Zeigarnik effect is a psychological phenomenon that is used extensively in entertainment games. It states that people remember uncompleted or interrupted tasks better than completed tasks (McKinney, 1935). This significantly increases the drive to complete tasks. In games, the Zeigarnik effect is …