All posts filed under: Gamification

2002 – 2016 Gamification RIP. PS. I’m back.

Hello all, Firstly, let me start by apologising for the lack of activity on the blog for some time. I’ve been very busy over Christmas and the New Year with clients and plenty of storyboards! I wanted to give you an update on what I’ve been up to and what’s to come from Gaming in Training in 2016. I’ve spoken at a number of events at the tail end of 2015 and most recently at LT2016 which was a great experience and the floor was packed, encouraging to see so many people interested and enthused by gamification. My seminar was based on ‘Thinking like a Game Designer’ and showed the differences between good design and sloppy gamification application. So what’s to come in 2016? Well this year I want to focus more attention on delivering quality video blogs to you. This was really well received last year when I analysed a game in real time to show what we can learn. Fortunately I should be receiving a new camera set up this week to make sure …

E-Learning Awards 2015 Results – E-Learning Designer of the Year

As many of you know from reading my post last month I was shortlisted for the E-Learning Designer of the Year award, I’m incredibly pleased and proud to tell you that I won the Silver award. Yes, I know it’s not gold, but it’s still a great achievement that I take a lot of pride in. Full congratulations go to Paul Welch @ City & Guilds Kineo for picking up the Gold, it sounds like a lot of great work went on there this year. Also congratulations to Robert Doyle @ KPMG who picked up the bronze award. Of course a lot of thanks goes to the team I work with at Kallidus because without them the courses would stay as creative ideas or ‘wild dreams’ as some people refer to them. The Kallidus team also picked up 4 other awards including a Gold award for Best use of blended learning in partnership with Interact for all their work with Transport for London. All in all a very successful night for everyone. For me the …

Semiconscious Feedback – The new standard in E-Learning

It’s been way too long! Sorry about that, I’ve had a very busy month and I’ll have some more news on that along with the outcome of the E-Learning Awards 2015 in a small post that will coincide with this. On with the gamification talk and this time I want to look at feedback. What is it, what does it look like in games and how can we adopt the same principles? I believe feedback in games is the best example we can use in our industry, the way games consciously and sub-consciously shape our decisions is very powerful. Let’s remember games are an escape from reality. Within this virtual world players know if the direction they take is the right one. Feedback given at the right moment gives them guidance. When wrong decisions are taken, they won’t reach the next level. Appropriate feedback at the right moment keeps them motivated. Gamers are a unique audience, they don’t worry about failure instead they learn, they learn how to master the controls, they learn how to …

The Beginner’s Guide… (Using weird video games as inspiration for E-Learning)

So this week I want to take a look at a rather unusual game that has just been released, The Beginner’s Guide. This is an experience that we don’t often see in the world of video games. I’m going to leave an entire review of the game in the block quote below, I’m doing this because I feel there is a lot of value and creative inspiration that can be taken from reading more about the game. The review is provided by Eurogamer.net. Once we’ve had a look through and you’ve got your head around the concept we’ll move on to look at how we can take something this abstract and creative and apply it to E-Learning. The Beginner’s Guide, dials down the humour, nixes the satire, and cranks the meta narrative up to 11 in one of gaming’s most overtly autobiographical commercial projects. Much like The Stanley Parable, The Beginner’s Guide is a linear first-person game shorn of conventional mechanics like combat or puzzles (besides a single, relatively easy one early on). It also …

7 Ways Super Mario Maker Can Help Improve Your E-Learning

So I was going to pull out another video blog, but I’ve had some downtime this weekend where recording just wasn’t possible but writing was. I’ve been playing a lot of Super Mario Maker since its release on September 11th, not only has it been a brilliant game but it has provided me with a stupid amount of ideas for E-Learning. There’s a review I read of Super Mario Maker that said the following – “Making levels in Super Mario Maker – the Wii U’s powerful creative suite is easy. Making good levels, however, is much more difficult.” Nothing truer can be said about E-Learning. In this post I’d like to look at 7 things I’ve learnt from trying to create good levels in Super Mario Maker and how these points could improve your E-Learning. I’m actually going to list how to create good levels in Mario Maker and how the points crossover to E-Learning. This is in an attempt to show how my mind is working and how I make the links from video …

Shortlisted for E-Learning Designer of the Year!

A quick update just to let you know that I’ve been shortlisted for the E-Learning Designer of the Year award. The event is going to be held in London on November 25th. According to the website – The 2015 shortlist is our best yet and features entries from across the globe and from every sector!  Our 35 strong judging panel, co-ordinated by The eLearning Network and chaired by Tony Frascina, were faced with the colossal task of reviewing over 400 entries across 19 categories but have produced a truly impressive list of 145. There are currently five other great E-Learning Designers shortlisted for the award so I will let you know how I get on in November. Thank you to all of you who read this blog and who openly engage with me over social media, it’s a joy to write this and I am so glad I offer many of you creative inspiration. It’s always been my aim to look at the world of Learning from a different angle and I truly believe I’m only …